Itinerary

Highlights

  • Brothers, Daedalus, Elphinstone
  • Even experienced “Red Sea Divers” are amazed again and again from this tour.
  • Three of the most beautiful dive sites in the Red Sea together in one tour.
  • The “big brother” impresses with its steep faces and two wrecks – the Numidia and the Aida.
  • The “little brother” stitches with its colorful hard and soft corals in many overhangs and schools of fishes.
  • Big fishes, such as fox sharks, hammerhead sharks, grey sharks or oceanic white tip sharks promise you on both “brothers” exciting dives.
  • After the Brothers we continue to Daedalus Reef (order depending on weather conditions).
  • Also here it is “shark – rich” – Daedalus is famous for its Hammerhead school in the northern part of the island. Even small fish are plentiful, for example in “Anemone City ” – there are hundreds of “Clown fishes” around.
  • Elphinstone offers frequent interaction with oceanic white tip sharks, sometimes even under the boat. On the plateaus in the north you often find hammerheads.
  • On Wednesday afternoon, after an impressive tour, the boat moves to the marina.
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Elphinstone

From Marsa Alam, the boat travels north approx. one and a half hours to the Elphinstone Reef – a great excursion! Depending on the water level, the Elphinstone's high plateau lies at a depth between one and three metres. Strong surface currents and lots of boat traffic make it impossible to snorkel here.

Divers however can plunge straight into some challenging fun! The reef is known for its extraordinary biodiversity and, of course, also for sighting large fish. In the north, we dive down a sloping plateau from 18 to 40 metres, and in the south, down the underwater terraces . The west and east wall plunge steeply into the deep. The Elphinstone Reef has a total length of approx. 725 metres and a width of 140 metres.

Hard and soft coral in a myriad of colours make us rejoice under water – if we could, we'd jump for joy. Joining us are also turtles, moray eels, Red Sea percidae, whitetip reef sharks, hammerhead sharks, tiger sharks and honestly just about everything the Red Sea has to offer. If we don't see it here, then where?

Big Brother Island

The name Brother Islands comes from the company which did the electrical work for the lighthouse on the larger island. Both islands are of volcanic origin and sit atop a mountain ridge which plunges well over 1,000 metres in depth from the west side to the east side. The volcanic history can still be seen today: namely on the basalt rock, which is significantly darker than the reef structure itself.

Big Brother is 650 metres long and 180 metres wide. With the exception of the eastern plateau, we encounter a steep-faced reef in all directions. There's usually the chance for you to stretch out your legs on the island, smoke a shisha with the lighthouse keepers and purchase small souvenirs or simply to enjoy the view from the lighthouse! Depending on the mood of the military, this can quickly change however.

At the western end of Big Brother, we usually have to take large waves and a stronger current into account. Should the conditions allow us to dive in the afternoon, we may quite possibly have the chance of seeing grey reef sharks and hammerhead sharks swimming between the wrecks.

On the eastern plateau, the thresher shark says 'Good night' to the spotted sea hare and encounters with grey reef sharks also occur here all the time. Beautiful depressions in the reef, which are covered in soft and hard coral, can be identified further down the north side. Mooring points are also located in the east area and around the boots there's a lot to see – from whitetip oceanic sharks to silky sharks.

Just as squirrels in the park learn to trust, so do Napoleon wrasse in famous diving sites – two specimens of this fish already accustomed to divers can be found west at any time of the day. Gigantic shoals of fish can be found in the south, near the jetty, which is used to supply the lighthouse. Mackerel, tuna and barracudas on the hunt usually rush past us in the water. Silky sharks or whitetip oceanic sharks as well as turtles top off this spectacular underwater picture.

Numidia

The Red Sea has at the Brothers a width of 180 km, but the crew managed to strike this small island – shortly after two clock at night Captain Craig was rudely awakened from the mighty impact of the ship on the reef at the northern end of the “Big Brother”.

The “on duty” officer Merwood had fallen asleep at the same time with his boss. The route led the ship then in truly instinctive certainty in the middle of the reef.

So the ship got stuck in the narrow fringing reef and all efforts to self release failed.
In the following days other ships were still trying to drag the Numidia freely, but they failed as well.

Captain Craig remained only the thankless task to stay on the desolate island for several weeks and to monitor the recovery of the cargo.
Probably in the winter storms 1901/02 the ship was then torn from the reef and sank definitively.
As already mentioned, high waves and strong currents make diving here often difficult or impossible!

Aida

Originally, it was meant for the Egyptian port and lighthouse administration, and however, it was used later for ferry and supply work in Egyptian ports.
At the southeast coast of Big Brother Island, where Egyptian soldiers were always stationed for two months, the Aida was supposed to provide the supplies for the soldiers. It had fresh water, food and the next “watch” on board.

On the 15. September 1957 in a heavy storm, and despite several warnings, the captain decided to drive and tried to fasten to Big Brother. It struck to the reef. The Aida began to sink rapidly and the captain did not have any other choice, but to leave than the ship with his crew and give it up. A life raft was still able to be discharged, and all 77 sailors were taken safely on board, before the Aida sank, and set them down on Big Brother.

The dive is an unusual dive, it doesn’t matter how experienced a diver you are. It will surprise you, how a ship can sink onto the sloping reef edge in such a way that it looks as if it’s been parked. Since the ship contains no more cargo, it is assumed that this slipped off by the wreck and lies now in deeper regions. The same as, the AIDA stands straight up on the sloping reef edge, the highest point at 25 m, the propeller at 57 m. Apart from the collision with the reef the ship is still perfectly intact.
For more than 40 years now
it stands there and becomes ever more a part of the reef. Covered in coral. With increasing depth you will find a variety of all sorts of corals and soft corals. Within the upper area, these appear by daylight in a multiplicity of colours, and leave a unique impression. With regards to fish, beside the entire range of the usual fish, large tuna can very often be found.

Small Brother Island

The name Little Brother sounds cute, but this dive isn't for rookies. There are mooring points on the reef's south-east side, however, most dives start off from the Zodiac. Little Brother is 360 metres in length and 160 metres in width and it runs north in the shape of a wedge. Bordered by a protective fringe reef, the reef drops steeply down. In the south-east at a depth of 10 metres, there is a small reef spur which ends with an overhang at 37 metres. A lagoon-like wall leads to a large gorgonian garden here.

Boasting massive overhangs and large depressions, the reef extends to the north-west where a small hill has been formed at a depth of 40 metres – the Shark Point. During the morning hours, we often see grey reef sharks who've come to have their teeth brushed after a successful night of hunting. From the south-east to the north, Little Brother is shaped by a steep face, which exists between a depth of 25 and 40 metres.

Shaab Shona

Shaab Shona's lagoon originates from a wadi (a dried-out river) and is five to 45 metres deep in some places. We can still recognise the former river in the form of a channel ascending from the north to the south. A high plateau can be made out in the northern area of Shaab Shona.

From glassfish to crocodilefish, from Indian mackerel and ghost pipefish, we will find everything that a diver's heart wants to see in the Red Sea. Many different kinds of coral brimming with life can be found on the reef's edge down to a depth of around 20 metres.

A seagrass bed is located in the inner area and where there's beds of seagrass, then ... that's right ... there's probably dugongs there. With some luck, a few of these fine specimens can be seen here. An eye should be kept out for lionfish and large turtles, too.

Whoever is still not happy and wants to see a few sand eels and different kinds of rays, should make their way over to the southern edge to the sand pile at a depth range of 20 to 40 metres.

Daedalus

With a length of 600 to 700 metres and a width of 100 to 300 metres (north to south), the Daedalus Reef is a very large reef. In the eastern section and in a depth range of 18 and 40 metres, we'll find a lagoon-like plateau from which, depending on the current, we can usually watch multiple groups of hammerhead sharks swimming at open sea.

There are usually 12 to 25 specimens in a group and it's definitely worth it to wait around at depths of 20 and 25 metres – this is a sight none of us want to miss out on. Almost all boats, which drop anchor at Daedalus, send their Zodiacs to the north in the early morning hours. The best spot to enter the water is namely in the northwest corner. It's best to quickly dive to a depth of four metres, so that you won't be carried too far by the surface current which could possibly occur.

Hammerhead sharks emerge mainly from the deep. When a shark dives past us at some distance and leans to one side, then it's trying to tell us that he rules the sea. Nevertheless, these animals are shy and if we get too close, they'll be gone at a rate of knots. Some lucky divers have even been able to observe groups of hammerhead sharks for up to 20 minutes.

Manta Point is also located nearby and is absolutely enthralling with its colourful reef wall. On the west side, we can see one of the largest colonies of sea anemones in the Red Sea. 200 examples of each species and each color have firmly anchored themselves to the reef, living in close quarters on a surface measuring just 10 metres in width.

Continuing south our breath is completely taken away: the gigantic hard coral which sits here will make you feel like a hobbit among elves when you gaze eyes upon it. Just like a waterfall, it plunges from a depth of four to 19 metres. Sadly, the first signs of damage can already be seen.

Itinerary

Day 1

Arrival

After arrival in Hurghada or Marsa Alam transfer to the boat.
Check in, dinner and spending the first night onboard in the marina.


Departure

Departure in the morning.
Instruction on the boat,
Diving, safety and equipment briefing.
Two dives at Small Giftun Island

Day 2

Day 3

Brother Islands

Two dives at Big Brother
One dive at Small Brother


Daedalus

Dives at
Daedalus north
Daedalus south
Daedalus west

Day 4

Day 5

Daedalus

Dives at
Daedalus north
Daedalus south-west
Daedalus south


Elphinstone reef

Dives at
Elphinstone north
Elphinstone south
Abu Dabab
Night dive at Abu Dabab

Day 6

Day 7

Return

Two dives at Marsa Shona
Head to Port.
At least 20 hour safety rest before flying would be given to all participants.
Handing trip educational material/ videos.


Check out

Breakfast and check out latest at 10:00 am.
Transfer to the airport or hotel.

Day 8